Resolute: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Aug 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

This issue is incredibly good.

Apex is privileged to work with some of the most imaginative, most powerful creators in genre these days. “A User Guide to the Application of Gem–Flowers,” by Bogi Takács is exquisite. And poetry editor Elise Matthesen called Alvaro Zinos–Amaro’s “Conservation of Energy” an exploration of the “intense physics of grief and hatred.”

I love Erik Amundsen’s short piece, “Jupiter and Gentian,” enough so to select it for this month’s podcast. John Moran’s “The Sandbirds of Mirelle” and Foz Meadows’ “Ten Days’ Grace” have nothing to do with each other, at all — save that the tensions between identity, occupation, and essential humanity are strained in both stories. The narrative voice in “Sister of Mercy,” by Amanda Forrest, caught my attention the first time I read it.

“The Good Matter,” by Nene Ormes, is the first English publication of the piece, first seen at Finncon (July 2013). Our thanks to Nene for the privilege.

Apex is also pleased to present an unusual novel excerpt, the first chapter of Colin Adams’ Zombies and Calculus. It’s a math novel. Go on, take a look.

Duane de Four warns us of “The Testosterone Injection That Could Ruin Orphan Black.” Loraine Sammy interviews cover artist Cyril Rolando about our cover, “After the Rain,” and his artistic process. And Andrea Johnson interviews John Moran about writing, art, and discontinuity.

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And now a brief word on another topic.

I love SF/F cons. I love comics conventions. I have worked on and for conventions. I am friends with people at all levels of con–running across the country. These are my people. And yet I am angry at or frustrated with or disappointed in a number of conventions.

There are too many controversies and problems to go into. Some I have only heard about. Some I have knowledge of, but that knowledge is not mine to share. I am torn between wanting to call the conventions out publically and wanting to give them the space and time to make smart, ethical decisions. In every case, I am waiting, biding my time, willing the human beings who run these conventions to get their acts together, own up to the failures, and be better.

Be better.

In the meantime, though, I have the consolation of fiction. Bright fiction, smart fiction, passionate fiction. I have the consolation of thoughtful essays and interviews, the intentioned text carrying us forward to our next self. The words of these creators settle into us, become part of us, make us the people we will be.

Sit down with Apex. Enjoy. Ponder. Let these words become part of tomorrow’s better you.

Sigrid Ellis
Editor–in–Chief

Sigrid Ellis

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