In the early days when you first went into space, aboard a space station, you spent time with trained astronauts. How did their company impact on your initial sojourn beyond the Earth?

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While on the space station you helped to facilitate an experiment in which you attempted to construct a web in zero gravity. Your first attempts were fairly dismal. Did this in any way diminish your sense of identity as a house spider?

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Eventually you not only succeeded but developed a new web design suited to gravity-free environments. As a result we realised that house spiders cope far better with zero gravity than humans. Was this when you began to realise your superiority over us?

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Sometime after returning to Earth you were cloned and re-engineered into your current omni-immortal state and were at the forefront of web rocket and web space-city architectural design. You are currently building an elastic bridge between Mercury and Venus. How insignificant do you consider us now?

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Thank you for taking the time to answer our questions.

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image016John W. Sexton lives in the Republic of Ireland and is the author of five poetry collections, including Vortex (Doghouse, 2005), Petit Mal (Revival Press, 2009), and The Offspring of the Moon (Salmon Poetry, 2013). His sixth collection, Futures Pass, is forthcoming from Salmon. Under the ironic pseudonym of Sex W. Johnston he has recorded an album with legendary Stranglers frontman, Hugh Cornwell, entitled Sons of Shiva, which has been released on Track Records. He is a past nominee for The Hennessy Literary Award and his poem “The Green Owl” won the Listowel Poetry Prize 2007. In 2007 he was awarded a Patrick and Katherine Kavanagh Fellowship in Poetry.

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