Posts Tagged "nonfiction"

Clavis Aurea: A Review of Short Fiction

by on Aug 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

I am of the opinion that Boris Pasternak’s Doctor Zhivago is the greatest post–apocalyptic novel ever written. It has everything: the collapse of a great empire, a world–spanning war, an apocalyptic winter, a gritty civil war, ruined cities, post–industrial scrounging, wilderness survivalism, and even cannibalism. Genre readers are often surprised when I recommend it because what they remember of Doctor Zhivago is a wistful love story, scenic Russian winters and maybe the appendices full of poetry. That isn’t the end of the world. That is life. It is unquestionably simpler to write a post–apocalypse which fetishizes the scenario — who bombed out who, how what diseases...

Read More

The Testosterone Injection That Could Ruin Orphan Black…And how to make sure it doesn’t

by on Aug 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Game of Thrones? Forget that… if you want to watch a sci–fi/fantasy show with unquestionable feminist bona fides, look no further than BBC America’s Orphan Black. Here’s a quick spoilerish primer of the show, in case you haven’t been watching (why haven’t you been watching?!?): The show’s protagonist is Sarah Manning (the amazing Tatiana Maslany), a grifter who kicks off the series by witnessing a suicide. As fate would have it, the woman who killed herself just happened to look a lot like Sarah (and by a lot, I mean exactly the same). Seeing this lookalike’s suicide as an opportunity to finally rid herself of a drug dealing, abusive ex–boyfriend and start a more stable...

Read More

Resolute: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Aug 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

This issue is incredibly good. Apex is privileged to work with some of the most imaginative, most powerful creators in genre these days. “A User Guide to the Application of Gem–Flowers,” by Bogi Takács is exquisite. And poetry editor Elise Matthesen called Alvaro Zinos–Amaro’s “Conservation of Energy” an exploration of the “intense physics of grief and hatred.” I love Erik Amundsen’s short piece, “Jupiter and Gentian,” enough so to select it for this month’s podcast. John Moran’s “The Sandbirds of Mirelle” and Foz Meadows’ “Ten Days’ Grace” have nothing to do with each other, at all — save that the tensions between identity, occupation, and essential humanity are...

Read More

We Are Comics: A Visual Message for Visual Medium

by on Jul 1, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

“We Are Comics” was born from frustration. In April of 2014, every woman in comics was talking about Janelle Asselin: one of us, an editor and writer who’d been getting a nonstop barrage of graphic rape threats and other harassment in response to an article where she criticized the hypersexualization of a teenage girl on the cover of Teen Titans. Ironically, most of the worst threats were coming in the form of responses to a survey Asselin had posted about sexual harassment in the comics industry and community. And among the threats and insults, there was one comment, more than others, that stuck with me. “Women in comics are the deviation, the invading body, the...

Read More

Resolute: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Jul 1, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

There are a lot of different ways to make a revolution. I’m pulling this from memory, and Google wasn’t helpful, so forgive my errors. But there’s a story I’ve heard, about the five men who meet on a road. The kingdom is repressive, and the men are fearful. One of them says, “We should not be here, it is forbidden.” Another replies, “We have nothing to fear.” The first says, “What do you mean?” The second man replies, “The penalty for the five of us to meet is death, is it not?” The frightened men agree that this is the case. The man explains:  “The penalty for rebellion is also death. We are already condemned men for standing in the road. So what more do we have to...

Read More