Posts Tagged "Lynne M. Thomas"

Apex Magazine picks up two Hugo Award nominations!

by on Apr 21, 2014 in Blog | 0 comments

Our short fiction digital zine Apex Magazine has picked up two Hugo Award nominations! *Best Semiprozine, Apex Magazine and editors Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, and Jason Sizemore This is the trio’s third nomination in a row! *Best Short Story, “If You Were a Dinosaur, My Love” (Click here to read) by Rachel Swirksy (Issue 46, March 2013) For a full list of nominees, go here. They will be presented at Loncon 3, London, United Kingdom, August 17, 2014 Apex wishes congratulations Lynne, Michael, Jason, Rachel, and all the other Hugo nominees. Well...

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Blood on Vellum: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Dec 3, 2013 in Nonfiction | 1 comment

Welcome to Issue 55 of Apex Magazine. We’re closing out the year with a great selection of stories. In this issue, we open with “What You’ve Been Missing,” a rumination on hippocamps by Maria Dahvana Headley. Kat Howard brings us “Haruspicy and Other Amatory Divinations,” a new way of searching for love. Ken Liu’s flash piece “Before and After” explores suburban fantasy via stream–of–consciousness. Sandra McDonald’s “Our Daughters” interrogates an alternate universe. Our classic this month is from the inimitable Rachel Swirsky. “All that Fairy Tale Crap” was the closing story in Glitter & Mayhem. I guarantee that you will never look at Cinderella the same way again. Our nonfiction includes Daniel José Older’s “Another World Waits: Towards an Anti–Oppressive SFF,” a clarion call for embracing all kinds of stories and writers, and an interview with Maria Dahvana Headley by Maggie Slater. Our gorgeous cover is by artist Katy Shuttleworth, specially commissioned for this issue. (You may recognize her style from the covers of my co–edited books Chicks Dig Time Lords, Whedonistas, and Chicks Dig Comics books.) This is a bittersweet editorial for me, as this is my last issue as Editor–in–Chief of Apex Magazine. I have been so very pleased with the high quality of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and art that we’ve showcased over the past 26 issues from a diverse group of voices within the genre. Thank you to all of our writers, from award–winning veterans to writers making a first sale, for submitting to Apex Magazine and for giving me the opportunity to share your work. It has truly been a privilege to work with all of you. I’m also grateful to the Hugo Award voters, who have nominated us for the Best Semiprozine Hugo award two years running. Your recognition of our work means a great deal to us. I am most grateful for all of our amazing readers. You have proven that there is a global audience for diverse, experimental SF/F. I want to take a moment to thank everyone who contributed to Apex Magazine’s production over the past couple of years, from Catherynne M. Valente for thinking of me as her successor, to Jason Sizemore, our publisher, who has been so supportive of the magazine, to each and every one of our submissions editors, copyeditors, proofreaders, layout and ebook formatters, and our publicity folks. A magazine is a labor of love, and I thank you from the bottom of my heart for sharing your time, effort, and love of the genre with me, and with our readers. Finally, I need to thank my co–conspirator, husband, and partner in crime, Michael Damian Thomas, who is also stepping down as Apex Magazine’s Managing Editor. My love, your contribution to this magazine has been above and beyond the call of duty. I could not have done this without your support, logistics, and good taste. I deeply appreciate the team that we have become as we have continued to work together, and I look forward to our next adventure together. While we’re taking a much needed break for several months (which will include major surgery for our daughter), plans are already in the works for future projects together and separately, so rest assured that this is not the end of my (or Michael’s) editorial careers. I hope that you will keep an eye out, and support us in future endeavors. We very much look forward to seeing you again. In the meantime, it is a distinct pleasure to hand the reigns of Apex Magazine over to Sigrid Ellis beginning with the January issue. Sigrid is a good friend and past collaborator on other projects. I very much look forward to seeing what she and her team will do next with Apex Magazine. Lynne M. Thomas Editor–in–Chief...

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The SF/F Community: An Essay

by and on Nov 5, 2013 in Nonfiction | 1 comment

There are days for us that the current fandom kerfuffle makes one want to, as in the words of Seanan McGuire, “ignite the biosphere.” It’s very easy to get frustrated and angry at the problems that crop up and want to retire from it all, almost always for very good reasons. This is not one of those days. Today, we give thanks. When we formed the SF Squeecast with our friends and colleagues, our impetus was to add positivity to the genre. We think it’s as important to remember the reasons we still turn up, day after day, despite the kerfuffles. Chicks Dig Time Lords (edited by Lynne and Tara O’Shea) was designed as a love letter to Doctor Who fandom. Lynne’s essay in it started out as a retelling of how she married into Michael’s fandom. The parts that resonated with most people, though, are the parts about our daughter Caitlin, who has Aicardi Syndrome (and severe disabilities as a result). Our experiences in fandom with Caitlin do not reflect the rest of the “real world” — fandom has been completely welcoming to Caitlin and our family, accepting us as we are, on our own terms. Since writing that essay, we have become more embedded in the SF/F world. We also lost all of our family support; we no longer have family willing or able to watch Caitlin so that we can attend conventions. Our friends, a mixture of fans, conrunners, and SF/F professionals, have pitched in to help watch Caitlin and make it possible for us to have a little time off — something that we simply don’t get in our local community. For that, we are deeply thankful. There are other things about our community that make us squee with delight. Like the Thanksgiving holiday, not everything is perfect (there are often underlying problematic issues), but overall, there is a lot of good in this SFnal world. So, let’s recognize that good, shall we? 1. Access to Awesome The internet makes amazing things possible. In 2013, fans with web access can get to massive amounts of online free fiction (like Apex Magazine), fanfiction, SF/F music, short films, long films, and communities where they can connect to others with similar interests to discuss all of these things in loving, excruciating detail at any time. The internet — if you have the means and inclination — is also a fully stocked dealer room of all of the SF/F swag and books that you could possibly want, 24/7. EBooks and paper books are available with just a few clicks. If you don’t have the means or inclination to buy books, you still often have ways to read as many as you could possibly want. Many libraries across the country will gladly loan you both paper and eBooks from their own collections and from those of other libraries across the country, free of charge. Bluntly put, we have never had this much access to this much SF/F content. Gone are the days when you could read your way through your local library’s SF/F section and be “done” or “complete” in your survey of the field. You no longer need to borrow that one thing from that one person. Also, thanks to the internet, we have unprecedented access to the creators of the SF/F that we love. At any moment, millions of people can talk to Neil Gaiman with a single Tweet. You can join an online conversation with N.K. Jemisin or Aliette De Bodard. You can hang out on George R.R. Martin’s LiveJournal. There are Facebook pages, author-specific forums and websites, and fan-created and maintained wikis about particularly beloved series and worlds, not to mention online writer workshops, critique communities, Google hangouts and Skype visits, twitter interviews, and the like. It’s no longer required to attend conventions or be part of a special group of some sort to get access to SF/F creators. They are ALL OVER THE INTERNETS, across the world. There are still impediments, of course, but we are truly living in a more global SF/F world than even just a generation...

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Blood on Vellum: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Nov 5, 2013 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Welcome to Issue 54 of Apex Magazine. In this issue, my penultimate as Editor–in–Chief, I’m sharing some bittersweet stories and poetry along with a good laugh. Our new fiction includes “The Jackal’s Wife” by Vajra Chandrasekera, a story of transformation and betrayal. “Recordings of a More Personal Nature” by Bogi Takács, explores the value in the stories we carry with us, and “This is a Ghost Story” by Keffy R.M. Kehrli reimagines our notion of ghosts. Jim C. Hines’s “Creature in Your Neighborhood,” our classic story this month, tweaks a familiar childhood program in a rather distinctive manner. In nonfiction, Managing Editor Michael Damian Thomas and I give thanks for certain things in SF/F, and Maggie Slater interviews Jim C. Hines. Our cover art is by the inimitable Galen Dara, who also created the distinctive look of Glitter & Mayhem. I hope that you enjoy this issue of Apex Magazine.   Lynne M. Thomas...

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Interview with Kelly McCullough

by on Oct 1, 2013 in Interviews, Nonfiction | 0 comments

Kelly McCullough’s novels include the Webmage and Fallen Blade Series, and a forthcoming young adult series called School for Sidekicks. A member of the Wyrdsmiths writing group, he is known to walk Neil Gaiman’s dogs, and particularly dotes on his physics professor wife and numerous cats. Thanks, Kelly, for chatting with us! APEX MAGAZINE: What was the genesis for this story? KELLY MCCULLOUGH: It was the intersection of two things, as so many stories are. The first was the experience of a friend of mine. He was driving his Honda CRX cross country late at night and had his car go under a semi. If the car had been any taller or if he’d been anything other than incredibly lucky, he would no longer be with us. As it is, he came out of it in surprisingly good shape physically. But it was clearly pretty traumatic emotionally. So far, a pretty typical major accident story that we’ve all heard. But there was one detail that I’d never heard before that really stayed with me. The glass. For months after the accident he was finding bits of the glass. In his tool kit, working its way out from under his skin… etc. So, I looked into that a bit more and found out that it was actually fairly common, and could go on for years. Being a writer, I filed that away as a really haunting bit of life. Then, some time later, I started creating the world of the Urbäna, which basically started when I got to wondering where the magic in the world might go if there really were fey, and iron had really destroyed them. In nature free energy (magic in this case) doesn’t go begging for long. Something will evolve to make use of the resource. I was thinking about that one day as I happened to see a plastic bag caught in a downtown wind — it looked spookily animate — and BAM! the Urbäna were born. Skitters first — my animate bags — and then the Shatter when I connected the Urbäna to my friend’s story. AM: This story is different from your typical novelistic prose style, based on your Fallen Blade and Webmage novels (and was published about three years before Webmage). It’s told in third person rather than first, it has a more intimate, personal feel, and takes the theme of trauma head–on. Tell us about the shift from this kind of intimate, painful short story to producing novels with a cast of characters who tend to snark. KM: I’ve always shifted back and forth across styles and themes in my writing, it’s just not terribly apparent to the observer working only from what’s been published. The first WebMage short story predates “Shatter” by about three years and was my debut short, in Weird Tales. I’ve actually written three novels in the same general voice as “Shatter”, including one that’s all about the Urbäna, and I hope that they will someday see publication. So far I’ve had two deals for the set of them fall apart at the last minute, both times after years–long negotiations. So far, my darker and more serious stuff tends to sell well at short story length but hasn’t yet found the right home at novel length. While my snarkier, quirkier stuff does well at novel length. I also do flat out comedy writing, in the mode of my story FimbulDinner, which is a slapstick piece about gotterdammerung being played out as a food fight. My new middle grade novel, School For Sidekicks, which will be out next year, is closer to that mode. One of my biggest goals as a writer is to keep stretching myself and to try not to get boxed into doing one kind of fiction. I figure if I’m not trying to do things I’m not sure I can manage I’m doing it wrong. So far it seems to be working. AM: This story is set in the world of the Urbäna. Can you tell us a bit about the origins of this...

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