Posts Tagged "apex magazine"

The Other: HP Lovecraft, Alien, & Ghost Stories: Monstrifications of Dunbar’s Number

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

1720 WORDS Our social lives are fraught with peril over the question of who belongs and who doesn’t. What’s the difference between becoming a friend and getting friendzoned? Is it love or is it a stalker? Should I get to know my neighbors, even though we have nothing in common but location? How many illegal immigrants does it take to steal a job? What do I do when a coworker stabs me in the back? How bad does a blood relation have to get on Facebook before I can unfollow them without feeling guilty? Is it better to take advice from a stranger or from your parents? As much as we might want to treat everyone fairly, and as much as we don’t want to fall back on...

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Interview with Emma SanCartier

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

750 WORDS This month’s Apex Magazine features cover art from artist Emma SanCartier. SanCartier has worked on a diverse range of illustration and design projects, including children’s books, poster and product design, and illustrations for magazines. Over the past several years, she has been developing a line of designer toys and sculptures based off of her illustrated OddFauna creatures. APEX MAGAZINE: Your beautiful art for this month’s Apex cover, “the 3 Norns,” and many of your other works, are based on Norse mythology. What is it that fascinates you about mythology, and do you have specific ideas in mind when incorporating mythology into your art? EMMA SANCARTIER:...

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Poe Twist: The Tell-Tale Heart, by Edgar Allen Poe

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Poetry | 0 comments

120 WORDS We were too old to play hide & seek, so we added a handicap and did it in the dark. The game turned grim as you counted out loud— I trod softly like the newly blind, groping around for nooks to disappear in. Your bodiless voice could have been anyone’s— lover, intruder or specter. I crouched first under the sink then the coffee table, clung onto the beams of the mezzanine and hung there, willing my heartbeat to stop as I waited for a hand to descend. You moved in blackness, your senses open to the unperceived shadow, your eyes closed to better feel my body throbbing within the room, your spread–out hands, like a madman’s, stealthily crept toward my throat....

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Before My Father Vanished

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Poetry | 0 comments

90 WORDS in the Blacksun Nebulas he gave me a string of mooncrystals in cool ambers and the rogue purple–pinks of lost stars I wore them to bed and in the shower for twenty lunar years and to work in the rocket yards where they failed to warm amid bittersmoke and cinder even elements of the cold beyond under the jet and glare and noise one night they broke— scattered light across the gravel landing field I found only a handful ten unthawed cubes ten unleashed winter suns my father’s stardust remains Wendy Rathbone’s latest novel is Letters to an Android. She is also the author of the sf novel Pale Zenith, and more, from eyescrypublications.com. A collection of her short...

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Doors

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Poetry | 0 comments

110 WORDS The trees are alive with possums, mice, rats. I’m sure of it. Out on their night hunt, you tell me. I shiver. You are still, at ease. Doors, passages, you say, they’re everywhere. Where are we, I ask. The darkness answers in your voice, Are you sure we are? I am quiet, used to your way of explaining things. Are you sure this isn’t death and life is what happens after? I’m not sure. Next to you, I’m never sure of anything. We say good–bye, your eyes human again, not the oak–walled tunnels I’ve traveled all evening. Doors, I think. Remember, you say, and I nod, but I’ve already forgotten. Alina Rios spent the first part of her life in St. Petersburg, Russia, and...

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