Posts Tagged "apex magazine"

Interview with Carly Sorge

by on Jul 7, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

A professional illustrator from Fort Wayne, Indiana, this month’s Apex Magazine cover artist Carly Sorge creates a wide variety of digital artwork. Her pieces, many for tabletop RPG games, feature varied genres including science fiction, fantasy, and horror. APEX MAGAZINE: For your piece “Submersible,” the color palette is much more subdued than many of your other works. How does the choice of color affect the emotion of a piece, and does the duotone nature of the work offer something that a full color piece might not? CARLY SORGE: Color is a powerful, if not the prime, driver of emotion, and control of color is one of the most difficult skills to master. Often a...

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For Exposure: The Life and Times of a Small Press Publisher (Excerpt)

by on Jul 7, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

When people learn you’re the editor of a short fiction magazine, they press you for all the lurid slush pile stories. They understand that the world overflows with twisted, confused individuals and that, as an editor, you have chosen to make your living with the creative output from that crowd. Due to ghastly curiosity, they have questions. What’s the craziest story you’ve ever received? Oh, I’ll get to that later. Have you ever read anything that made you want to call the police? No. But other things related to editing have. I’ll get to that later, too. Has anybody famous ever submitted a story? Stephen King, if you’re reading this, I’m still waiting for your story....

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How the World was Made—a Super Crown

by on Jul 7, 2015 in Poetry | 0 comments

[Note from poetry editor Bianca Spriggs] Because of its uniqueness, this month’s poetry selection, “How the World Was Made—A Super Crown” by Roger Bonair-Agard, requires some context in terms of content and form. I have a soft spot for a handful of devices in literature, and this work harnesses three of my favorites: tricksters, creation myths, and the sonnet. This work revolves around Anansi, a character best known in West African and Caribbean folklore. True to quintessential trickster characteristics, Anansi is most recognized as a spider but can shape-shift, adopting the appearance and behavior of a man. In Bonair-Agard’s telling, Anansi (the man) is his own...

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How Horror Made Me More Empathetic

by on Jul 7, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Recently, a New Republic article entitled “What It Says About You if You Enjoy Horror Movies” caused a lot of controversy and angered many horror aficionados and creators, including myself. One of the conclusions, and the one that drew the most ire, was that people who enjoy horror movies lack empathy. (The article can be found here: newrepublic.com/article/120689/babdook-what-it-says-about-you-if-you-enjoy-horror-movies) I take exception to this as someone who considers himself both an empathetic person and a lover of the horror genre. My fiancé is one of the kindest, most compassionate people I’ve ever met, and also a voracious devourer of all things horror. These two...

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Never Chose This Way

by on Jul 7, 2015 in Short Fiction | 3 comments

1600 Words Once upon a time, I thought I was a girl. Once upon a time, I lived in a castle. Well, it wasn’t really a castle. It was a fortress of sorts, though, and it had something like a moat and something like dragons, or that’s the story we told each other at night, whispered from room to room, down halls that stank of antiseptic and that stuff you sprinkle on carpets to soak up bodily fluids. The smell, I think, lent something to it. The dragons all had hypodermic needles. The dragons all wore scrubs. There were bars on our windows, and we had all been somebody’s princess once, but somebody got disillusioned. Because teenage girls are like that. You try to raise us...

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