Nonfiction

After Our Bodies Fail

by on Apr 1, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Humans are ridiculous and wonderful. We are incandescent spirits walking around inside clumsy, fragile meat–puppets, and we are such clever creatures that we routinely exceed the survivability limits of our bodies. Every day, many of us hurl ourselves into the world at speeds exceeding 60 mph, wear lightweight clothing despite temperatures that could cause hypothermia and death, and stand beside our food while we bombard it with electromagnetic radiation that can cook flesh from the inside out. We think nothing of it. When our bodies fail to work the way we want them to, we apply the same ferocious ingenuity to surpassing physical limitations imposed upon us. As a...

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Resolute: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Apr 1, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

The world works in downright strange ways. Magazines are put together months in advance. It was in, oh, December of last year, I think, that Cameron and Elise and I determined that the April issue of Apex would be about repair. About fixing the world, about how that goes right or goes wrong, about how pieces interconnect and fit together. Or don’t. About how the past can be repaired, or replaced, about the friability of a body, a plan, a history, or a life. For a week in February of 2014, I was told I almost certainly had throat cancer. And then a damn miracle occurred, and I do not. I spent a great deal of February of this year thinking about the plan I hoped for my...

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Invisible Bisexuality in Torchwood

by on Mar 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 1 comment

One of the best moments in any episode of Doctor Who is in “The Doctor Dances” when the Doctor explains to Rose that their new friend, Captain Jack Harkness, is “flexible” with his sexuality. Jack doesn’t restrict himself to monosexuality. He doesn’t even restrict himself to humans. He’s an omnisexual man of the 51st century, ready to “shag anybody as long as they’re gorgeous enough,” as Toshiko Sato later puts it. Toward the end of “The Parting Of The Ways” when Jack kisses both Rose and the Doctor, he solidified his status as one of my favorite characters and I knew I’d follow him anywhere… even to Torchwood. I’ve paid dearly for this love on many occasions. For a...

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Resolute: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Mar 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Angels fall. Humans fall. We fall in love. We fly, and we fall, and sometimes we can’t tell the difference. This month Apex brings you tales of flight, tales of plummeting, and tales of infinite chances. In many ways this month is a month of fresh starts and do–overs. It is March, after all, and in much of the world March is a month of change. The seasons change in all the hemispheres, the light balances and tips and shifts over the entire world. March is a month of indefinites, of either–or, of it–could–go–both–ways. March is a threshold. It’s the edge of the precipice. We rise and soar, or we plummet. This month, Sunny Moraine gives us “To Increase His Wondrous...

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Interview with Lucy A. Snyder

by on Feb 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Besides knowing the intricacies of installing Linux on a dead badger, Lucy A. Snyder is the two–time Bram Stoker Award–winning author of the poetry collection Chimeric Machines and the Stoker Award–winning short story “Magdala Amygdala,” which originally appeared in Apex’s own Dark Faith: Invocations. Her fiction and poetry have appeared in Weird Tales, GUD, Strange Horizons, and Lady Churchill’s Rosebud Wristlet, among numerous anthologies. She is the author of the Jessie Shimmer dark urban fantasy series which includes the novels Spellbent, Shotgun Sorceress, and Switchblade Goddess. Her fiction and poetry have been compiled in over half a dozen collections, most...

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So How Does It End?

by on Feb 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Humans have always been fascinated with stories about the end of the world. Almost every culture and religion has some myth dealing with the death of Earth. The natural question that follows “Where did the world come from?” is “how does it die?” Such myths typically take it to a literal end: a god or gods or some god–triggered event reduces the Earth to an uninhabitable state. From Ragnarok, where the world is submersed in water, to the Book of Revelations’ “great, fiery red, seven–headed dragon” that “drags a third of the stars of heaven with his tail, and throws them to the Earth,” humanity as–we–know–it ends with the world. With The Odyssey and The Aeneid we start to...

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