Nonfiction

The Other: HP Lovecraft, Alien, & Ghost Stories: Monstrifications of Dunbar’s Number

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

1720 WORDS Our social lives are fraught with peril over the question of who belongs and who doesn’t. What’s the difference between becoming a friend and getting friendzoned? Is it love or is it a stalker? Should I get to know my neighbors, even though we have nothing in common but location? How many illegal immigrants does it take to steal a job? What do I do when a coworker stabs me in the back? How bad does a blood relation have to get on Facebook before I can unfollow them without feeling guilty? Is it better to take advice from a stranger or from your parents? As much as we might want to treat everyone fairly, and as much as we don’t want to fall back on...

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Interview with Emma SanCartier

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

750 WORDS This month’s Apex Magazine features cover art from artist Emma SanCartier. SanCartier has worked on a diverse range of illustration and design projects, including children’s books, poster and product design, and illustrations for magazines. Over the past several years, she has been developing a line of designer toys and sculptures based off of her illustrated OddFauna creatures. APEX MAGAZINE: Your beautiful art for this month’s Apex cover, “the 3 Norns,” and many of your other works, are based on Norse mythology. What is it that fascinates you about mythology, and do you have specific ideas in mind when incorporating mythology into your art? EMMA SANCARTIER:...

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Interview with Ursula Vernon

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

2340 WORDS Ursula Vernon is an illustrator, author, graphic novelist, gardener, and animal wrangler. She’s won the Hugo Award, the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award, and was nominated for an Eisner award. Her novels for children include Nurk and the Dragonbreath Series, and her webcomics and graphic novels include Digger (winner of aforementioned awards), Irrational Fears, and Little Creature. Writing for adults and children, Ursula combines intelligent storytelling and empowered characters into the kinds of stories that grow and change alongside the reader. Her newest books, written under the pen name T. Kingfisher, include The Seventh Bride and Toad Words and Other Stories....

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Words from the Editor-in-Chief

by on Jan 6, 2015 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

Happy New Year and welcome to 2015! I started Apex Publications (and the initial iteration of this zine) back in 2005. To think that ten years have passed… well, I’d rather not think about it. Instead, let’s focus on the here and now, and talk about the changes Apex Magazine has undergone over the last three months. Most obviously, you’ll note that the zine has a new editor–in–chief. Sigrid Ellis, by any measure, did a great job, and I offer my deepest thanks and gratitude for the work she accomplished. I have an opportunity to work for Apex full–time within the next few months, and having the magazine back under my direct control offers me the chance of making the...

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Fandom: Not Just Funny Business

by on Dec 2, 2014 in Nonfiction | 1 comment

3850 WORDS As I supervised the towering pile of tentacle hentai, my boss started cursing behind me. “Dammit, dammit! Sell it all, sell it all! They’re going out of business.” While I had always known a company somewhere made the products I helped sell, that was the moment I realized that conventions were more than costumes and fun. An entire industry runs on the backs of the fans. For me, the revelation hit late for sure, but it has stuck with me as I’ve continued to go to conventions and been on various sides of the table. Over the years I’ve been just an attendee there to enjoy the panels and items for sale. I came to meet some of the celebrities, show off my...

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Statistics vs. Story

by on Nov 4, 2014 in Nonfiction | 0 comments

1734 WORDS As an author of historical fiction, there are several debates about what to do and what not to do as an author that I don’t hear as much in regard to other genres. “Realism” has more rigid boundaries for many people, sensitive topics like racism, sexism, religion, and politics cause even more friction through the author’s treatment of them, and everyone has their own ideas about how much research serves a story versus how much it gets in the way. In discussion forums and at conventions, variations on these same topics rear their heads afresh anytime new people get involved in the dialogue. Of course, as an author, the job is to tell a good story, not to make...

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